Former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergEngel scrambles to fend off primary challenge from left It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Liberals embrace super PACs they once shunned MORE has reportedly spent more than $124 million in advertising across 14 states as he prepares a major push in states voting on Super Tuesday.

The Los Angeles Times reported Monday that the spending by the billionaire candidate has already eclipsed that of both his fellow Democratic primary contenders and President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE.

Super Tuesday on March 3 is expected to be a decisive moment for the 2020 Democratic primary, as more than 1,300 of the 1,991 delegates required to win the Democratic nomination will be up for grabs that day.

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“It’s on steroids,” one field organizer for Bloomberg’s campaign in Colorado told the Los Angeles Times. “I’ve never seen anything like it.”

The heavy ad spending has been sharply criticized by Democratic rivals such as Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.), who have argued that the billionaire is attempting to buy his way to the Democratic nomination.

“Hey guys, how do you buy the presidency? Well, you buy the presidency, at least he’s going to try to buy the presidency, by spending hundreds and hundreds of millions of dollars on TV ads,” Sanders said during a recent campaign appearance in Nevada, a state where Bloomberg will not be on the ballot in Saturday’s caucuses. “I didn’t see Mike in Iowa … I didn’t see Mike in New Hampshire. … Hey, you know what? I didn’t see him here in Nevada!”

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“Well, I got news for Mr. Bloomberg, and that is the American people are sick and tired of billionaires buying elections,” Sanders said.

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