Democratic presidential candidates reacted on Friday to their placement in the upcoming presidential primary debates, with most expressing eagerness ahead of the televised events later this month.

NBC News announced the placements for the two back-to-back debates, which are set to see front-runners former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.) face off with Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook McEnany says Juneteenth is a very ‘meaningful’ day to Trump MORE (D-Calif.) and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegScaled-back Pride Month poses challenges for fundraising, outreach Biden hopes to pick VP by Aug. 1 It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE on the second night.

Sanders’s campaign called it “a terrific lineup” and a chance to debate issues that matter to the presidential candidate, including “Medicare for All.”

“This is a terrific lineup because there will be a real debate over the key set of choices in this Democratic primary,” said Sanders’ campaign manager Faiz Shakir in an emailed statement.

“This debate will also provide Senator Sanders the opportunity to highlight his leadership on a host of important issues, including Medicare For All, opposition to the Iraq war, votes against horrific trade agreements, and record of boldly taking on the fossil fuel industry and corporate greed,” Shakir added. “We look forward to hearing other candidates outline their visions for the country and plans to fully guarantee all people the right to health care, housing, education, a clean environment, and the freedom of basic economic rights.”

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Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.), who has recently been polling in third place, was notably scheduled for the first night, along with former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas), Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-N.J.), former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, New York Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioProtesters splash red paint on NYC streets to symbolize blood De Blasio: Robert E Lee’s ‘name should be taken off everything in America, period’ House Democratic whip pushes back on calls to defund police: We need to focus on reform MORE, Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard drops defamation lawsuit against Clinton It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic MORE (D-Hawaii), Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeInslee calls on Trump to ‘stay out of Washington state’s business’ Seattle mayor responds to Trump: ‘Go back to your bunker’ Trump warns he will take back Seattle from ‘ugly Anarchists’ if local leaders don’t act MORE, former Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyThe Hill’s Coronavirus Report: Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas says country needs to rethink what ‘policing’ means; US cases surpass 2 million with no end to pandemic in sight Minnesota AG Keith Ellison says racism is a bigger problem than police behavior; 21 states see uptick in cases amid efforts to reopen The Hill’s Coronavirus Report: Singapore Minister for Foreign Affairs Vivian Balakrishnan says there will be consequences from fraying US-China relations; WHO walks back claims on asymptomatic spread of virus MORE (D-Md.), Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanMinnesota AG Keith Ellison says racism is a bigger problem than police behavior; 21 states see uptick in cases amid efforts to reopen Congress must fill the leadership void Pelosi pushes to unite party on coronavirus bill despite grumbling from left MORE (D-Ohio) and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Democrats demand Republican leaders examine election challenges after Georgia voting chaos Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-Minn.).

Sens. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetSome realistic solutions for income inequality Democratic senators kneel during moment of silence for George Floyd 21 senators urge Pentagon against military use to curb nationwide protests MORE (D-Colo.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Warren, Pressley introduce bill to make it a crime for police officers to deny medical care to people in custody Senate Dems press DOJ over coronavirus safety precautions in juvenile detention centers MORE (D-N.Y.) are slated to debate on the second night, along with Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellNASCAR bans display of Confederate flag from events and properties Gloves come off as Democrats fight for House seat in California Grenell says intelligence community working to declassify Flynn-Kislyak transcripts MORE (D-Calif.), former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperGun control group rolls out first round of Senate endorsements The Hill’s Campaign Report: Republicans go on attack over calls to ‘defund the police’ Hickenlooper ethics questions open him up to attack MORE, best-selling author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson touts endorsements for progressive congressional candidates The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Warren becomes latest 2020 rival to back Biden The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden looks to stretch lead in Tuesday contests MORE and former tech executive Andrew YangAndrew YangGeorge Floyd protests show corporations must support racial and economic equality Andrew Yang discusses his universal basic income pilot program Andrew Yang on the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis MORE.

Despite being deprived of a chance to hit Biden and Sanders on the debate stage, Warren tweeted that she was looking forward to further sharing her policy proposals. 

Delaney, who has struggled to gain traction in the polls, released a statement saying he looks forward to sharing the stage with Warren.

“I am also pleased to be sharing the debate stage with many strong candidates, particularly Senator Warren who, like me, is talking about new ideas,” Delaney said. “I look forward to a debate on issues and solutions, not personality and politics.”

Booker responded to his placement on the first night’s stage with a fundraising email to supporters, saying the debate will present an opportunity for all of the candidates to stand out.

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“This debate will be a make or break moment for a lot of campaigns, including ours, and we’re confident that Cory will shine through. But we need your help,” Booker wrote.

Harris acknowledged her future debate partners in a fundraising email of her own.

“On June 27, 2019, I will share the national stage with candidates like Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, and Pete Buttigieg for the first debate of this Democratic presidential primary in Miami, Florida,” Harris wrote.

“Just a few days later, we’ll close the books on our campaign’s second quarter of fundraising. We need to demonstrate to our opponents and to the American people that our grassroots movement is in a strong position to win — and we’re ready to take the fight to Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE,” she continued.

Gillibrand gave her supporters the chance to host a watch party on June 27, tweeting a link to sign up.

O’Rourke also shared his excitement on Twitter, adding that it will give him a chance to further share his platform.

Hickenlooper praised his debate stage partners, but warned against socialism, which could be perceived as a dig at Sanders, who will appear onstage with him.

However, not every Democrat seeking the nomination made the lineup for the first debates.

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock’s (D) campaign released an ad with a Montanan named Jock, who calls Bullock’s future absence on the debate stage “horseshit.”

“You don’t need to be from Montana to know that anybody who wins by four in the same election that Trump won by 20 is doing something right here,” he said, referring to Bullock’s ability to win election in a red state. “He doesn’t qualify. Really?” 

— Updated at 3:34 p.m.

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